After much discrepancy about the “legitimacy” of the female orgasm, it’s time to set the record straight.

Around 10 to 15 percent of women never experience an orgasm in their life. Now all the men out there are saying, “not my woman!” Well, according to the University of Central Lancashire about 25 percent of women reported faking an orgasm regularly. This is detrimental not only to the lives of women, but also to their interpersonal relationships, because orgasms play a vital role in bonding, love and happiness.

The female orgasm is a complex beast which leads men, and women, to perpetuate common myths. But, before we can tackle common misconceptions we must first understand how the female orgasm works.

Once things start getting hot and steamy, your body knows what’s up and sends a rush of blood down to the pelvic area while increasing vaginal lubrication. According to Women’s Health Magazine, as you eventually get turned on more blood rushes to the genitals and signals the start of the female orgasm. Breathing and heart rate increase and the lower part of the vagina narrows. As a woman starts getting closer to orgasm, thier body begins to set up extreme muscle tension around the pelvic region. Hopefully, if all goes well, fireworks go off and you immediately release all of this wound up tension which signals a series of intense pleasure. This is considered the point of an orgasm, which sets off the simultaneous contraction of the uterus, vagina and anus in 0.8 second intervals.

So let’s get down to the first myth–Women reach orgasms through intercourse. According to the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), only about one third of women experience an orgasm regularly from intercourse. Another third of women can achieve orgasm from intercourse, but need extra stimulation, and the remaining third of women never achieve orgasms from intercourse. In fact, it is relatively normal for women to experience orgasms from other means, such as manual stimulation and oral sex. The SOGC even suggests that it is an essential variation of female sexuality.

Another myth is that of the g-spot orgasm. There’s been an increasing pressure in recent years over the use of the g-spot. While some women have claimed to experience a g-spot, research has failed to prove that the g-spot even exists. Since the jury is still out on where this mystical and elevating spot is hiding, you don’t have to feel bad if you have never experienced this type of orgasm.

The last misconception surrounding the female myth comes down to safe sex. Many people, mostly men who try to use this tactic, think that condom use affects the orgasm or how strong the orgasm is. Sex scientist at the University of Indiana, Debby Herbenick, Ph.D., brings this myth to life.

“Women are equally likely to experience orgasm with or without a condom,” said Herbenick. “In fact, condoms may help a couple spend more time having sex, as a man doesn’t have to ‘pull out’ quickly if he’s worried about ejaculating too soon.”

While the complexity of the female orgasm still needs more research, there is credible scientific understanding on the topic. Many women need to feel more comfortable with their sex lives and with their own selves.  So ladies get out there and get some ‘satisfaction’ added to your lives.